March 19, 2005

Lost Hitler Art

Lost Hitler Watercolors.jpg


It is well known that Adolf Hitler didn’t get into art school in Vienna. In fact many believe WWII and the Holocaust might have been totally avoided if Hitler had been accepted into the academy. What is less known is that before his political career Hitler actually made a meager living selling his paintings and drawings in Vienna and later Munich. The sadistic tyrant might not have been very talented but he never stopped making art. It was a habit that would almost lead to a major scandal for Der Fuhrer in the 20s. According to Ernst Hanfstaengl and F. Schwartz, the Nazi party treasurer at the time, Hitler was blackmailed by a man who had somehow gotten possession of a number of pornographic sketches and watercolors the Fuhrer had made of his then mistress Geli Raubal who suicided shortly afterwards. Hanfstaengl claims the pictures showed Geli in pornographic positions “which any professional model would decline to assume.” It is known that Hitler paid off the blackmailer and did not have the art works destroyed. They were preserved in his private safe in the Brown House. After the war they disappeared. Until now there has been no way to know for sure what these pictures looked like. We can, of course, assume the drawings and watercolors were not simply of Geli in the buff. In the Germany of the 20s there would have been nothing so shocking about such pictures that would have forced Hitler to bend to blackmail. It has all along been assumed that these pictures reveal the tyrants abnormal and perverse sexual tastes. No evidence exists that these pictures were ever destroyed. For years now it has been assumed that they were still out there somewhere. So, when claims are made that these pictures have surfaced, experts cannot deny that it is impossible. Of course, pictures like these would require rigorous authentication before any definitive conclusions could be made.

Posted by dmb at March 19, 2005 01:19 PM | TrackBack
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